The real chilling story of “Lolita”

I already wrote a post about the real stories and legends behing the most famous fairy tales (click HERE if you missed it)but, did you know that “Lolita” by Vladimir Nabokov was inspired by a real chilling story.

Florence “Sally” Horner‘s tragic story hit the country’s newspapers in 1950. Five years later, Nabokov’s novel about charming Humbert Humbert and 12-year-old Dolores Haze (a.k.a., Lolita) began to arrive in bookstores.

16389199-mmmain

On June 1948, Florence stole a note book from a local supply shop. The act was a rite of passage, the token for admittance to a girl’s club, a sorority she was eager to join. A man who claimed to be an FBI agent caught her in the act. He was way more older than the 11-year-old girl and he frightened her… but let her go, until the following day, when he appeared outside her school. This time he had some “instructions” : She’d have to convince her mother he was the father of two school friends, inviting her to a seashore vacation. He would take care of the rest with a phone call and a convincing appearance at the Camden bus depot.

His name was Frank La Salle, and he was no FBI agent. It took 21 months to break free of him, after a cross-country journey from Camden, New Jersey, to San Jose, California.

real-lolita

La Salle was already a convicted rapist and molested the girl, telling her that if she didn’t comply, he’d turn her in for stealing. During these years the pair travelled the country and where she attended school he pretended to be her father.

It was almost two years until Sally was able to reach out for help and break away from her perpetrator. LaSalle was arrested and Sally was 13-year-old, but her story took a tragic turn as she died two years later, killed in a car accident.

Nabokov saved newspaper clippings about the case, which he scribbled detailed notes on, but his debt to the defining experience in Horner’s life remains largely unknown to the reading public.

Elle Palmer. xo

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death

The “Crime Scene” is a place of intense activity where every element, however large or small, must be preserved as potential evidence.

Police teams work closely alongside an extensive network of forensic professionals under the direction of a Crime Scene Manager, drawing on a wide variety of expertise (including photography, entomology, bloodstain analysis and pathology) to scan the scene and retrieve important clues. Every fragment of evidence is individually recorded, packaged and sealed before undergoing the rigours of scientific testing.

Continue reading

Jack The Ripper: A Recap.

This is going to be the longest post ever! I’ve tried to keep it short but as you might imagine there’s always a lot to say about the most famous serial killer: Jack the Ripper. So, sit tight, grab a cuppa and enjoy!

Five murders are known to have been committed by the Ripper, but two others were once thought to have been his work as well. Emma Smith, who lived in Spitalfields, was attacked in the early hours of 3 April 1888. She said she had been assaulted by four men, but could or would not identify them. She died the next day.

Four months later, the body of Martha Tabram was found on a staircase, her throat and stomach had been stabbed with something sharp like a bayonet. Earlier that night, she and another prostitute had been seen in the company of two soldiers, they were then arrested but the second prostitute failed (or refused) to identify either her own or the other woman’s partner.

Continue reading